Fall 2018 Events

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ECCE Speaker Series Community Event Schedule

All events are free and open to the public. Individuals with disabilities who anticipate the need for accommodations should contact the UIS Speaker Series Office at 217/206-8507 or speakerseries@uis.edu in advance. Students currently enrolled in UNI 301: ECCE Speaker Series should refer to the event schedule posted on their course Blackboard site.


Fall 2018 Community Event Schedule coming soon  (PDF printable version)


The Movements of the ‘60’s: A Legacy for Today

Diane Nash

Thursday, September 13 | 6:00 p.m. | Student Union Ballroom

Co-Sponsored by Student Government Association

Diane Nash experienced racism for the first time when she left Chicago to attend college in the south. Her experience provides a tangible example of how American citizens live in the same country, but have different lived experiences on the basis of race, social class, gender, and region.  This event focuses on the legacy of the civil rights movement, includeing the continued fight for social justice.

Diane Nash’s involvement in the nonviolent movement began in 1959 when she was a student at Fisk University.  In 1960 she became the chairperson of the student sit-in movement in Nashville, TN – the first southern city to desegregate its lunch counters – as well as one of the founding students of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee. She coordinated the Freedom Ride from Birmingham, Alabama to Jackson, Mississippi in 1961 Her arrests for civil rights activities culminated in Nash being imprisoned for 30 days in 1961, while she was pregnant with her first child. President John F. Kennedy appointed her to a national committee that promoted passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Nash later became active in the peace movement that worked to end the Vietnam War, and became an instructor in the philosophy and strategy of non-violence as developed by Mohandas Gandhi.


Contemporary Attacks on American Constitutional Freedom: Hate Speech, Political Speech, and the Right to Privacy

Panel

Monday, September 17 | 6:00 p.m. | Brookens Auditorium

Co-Sponsored by UIS Department of Legal Studies

In recognition of Constitution Day the featured panel will discuss current issues related to race, free speech, politics and the press, and sexuality. They will examine how the U.S. Constitution addresses the civil liberties related to these important issues that we believe constitute the core of U.S. citizenship. An engaged citizen is a one who can freely participate in political discourse and question the actions of her government without fear for safety. Yet, as our panelists will discuss, these fears of being silenced or marginalized remain all too prevalent in our society because of current jurisprudential attitudes toward hate speech, the press, and the right to privacy that protects our individual choices relating to our own body. Our constitutional civil liberties serve as the fundamental legal guaranties that enable us to continue to be engaged in an open, free, and democratic society. These liberties, as our panelists will demonstrate, are under attack. This event will ask what we as a nation are obligated to do in order to protect these fundamental freedoms from anti-democratic and extra-constitutional sociopolitical forces.

James LaRue is the Director of the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. Author of “The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges,” LaRue was a public library director for many years, as well as a weekly newspaper columnist and cable TV host. In 2014, the Trustees of Douglas County Libraries named a library after him, and he’s not even dead yet.

Eugene McCarthy is an assistant professor of legal studies at UIS. His primary intellectual focus is on comprehending and explaining problematic or obscure areas of the law through historical, cultural, and literary texts. He is currently engaged in scholarship relating to constitutional hermeneutics, corporations and the law, the pharmaceutical industry, and the role of special interests in American legal institutions. Prior to academia, Eugene practiced as an attorney at one of the nation’s top law firms. Eugene’s current book project investigates the role that nineteenth-century corporate law played in shaping American culture and society.

Deborah Anthony is an associate professor of legal studies at UIS. Her research interests include modern and historical gender law and politics, constitutional law, feminist perspectives on family law, and employment discrimination. She has published on topics such as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act and its disparate effects on women, employment discrimination under Title VII, parental leave policies at colleges and universities, and sex-based rights in family law. Her project of the last several years has focused on the historical development of women’s legal and political status as viewed through the lens of their surnames, and several articles have resulted which focus on specific aspects of that development.


The Displaced Persons Act of 1948: Local, National, and International Contexts

Panel

Tuesday, September 25 | 6:30 p.m. | Brookens Auditorium

Co-Sponsored by Department of History, Lithuanian-American Club of Central Illinois, and the Illinois State Historical Society

The commemoration of the Displaced Persons Act (DPA) will emphasize how immigration at local and regional levels relates to the broader international context of the Holocaust and the post-World War II period. The U.S. passed the DPA in 1948, opening the doors to refugees of the war.  In 1952 and 1953 respectively, the U.S. passed additional legislation to expand the scope of immigration to regions occupied by the Soviets in and after 1945. This historical example of U.S. immigration policy has directly impacted the ethnic composition of our area, resulting in the influx of a large Lithuanian population in Chicago and Springfield. Furthermore, it has relevance for contemporary refugee crises and immigration debates.

Robert Vitas has a Ph.D. in Political Science from Loyola University, with expertise and publications on U.S. policy regarding the U.S.S.R. and Lithuania. He is Chairman of the Lithuanian Research and Studies Center and Executive Director, Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society.

Sandy Baksys has been a newspaper reporter, medical trade journalist, and for the last 22 years, a public relations consultant and writer. The daughter of a displaced person, she is the author of “A Century of Lithuanians in Illinois” and president of the Lithuanian-American Club of Central Illinois.

Devin Hunter is an assistant professor of US and Public History at UIS. He holds a Ph.D. from Loyola University Chicago and is currently working on a book manuscript that includes a chapter about “newcomer” migrant social programs in Chicago in the 1950s.

Heather Bailey is an associate professor of History at UIS with expertise in modern European and Russian history. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and her current book project concerns western European perceptions of Russia in the nineteenth century.


Intersex: Stories Not Surgeries

Pidgeon Pagonis

Tuesday, October 2 | 7:00 p.m. | Student Union Ballroom

Cosponsored by Diversity Center, Gender and Sexuality Student Services, Women’s Center, Women & Gender Studies, Department of Sociology/Anthropology, and UIC College of Nursing – Springfield Regional Campus

‘Intersex Stories, Not Surgeries’ encourages participants to grapple with the ways in which the Medical Industrial Complex (MIC) has consistently forgotten the first tenet of the Hippocratic Oath – First Do No Harm – when it comes to marginalized communities. While the MIC’s history is tattered with ableism, racism, classism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia—this presentation will specifically highlight the ways in which it has violated intersex people’s human rights. For over a century, intersex people have had no voice in their medical “care” and “treatment”, which has led to dire consequences. Key events throughout intersex history will be introduced to help participants understand why intersex activists across the globe have united to demand intersex bodily autonomy and justice.

Pidgeon Pagonis is an intersex activist, educator, and filmmaker from Chicago, IL. They are a leader in the intersex movement’s fight for bodily autonomy and justice. Pidgeon has a decade’s worth of experience giving talks and facilitating intersex workshops around the globe. In 2016, they were featured on the cover of National Geographic’s January issue titled Gender Revolution, launched an intersex-resource YouTube channel, co-founded the group Intersex People of Color for Justice (IPOCJ), introduced an intersex and non-binary art and clothing line, and also made a cameo on Amazon’s Transparent. They were among 9 LGBTQ Artists honored with a Champion of Change Award in 2015 from the Obama White House. Their writing has been featured in Everyday Feminism and scholarly journals such as Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics and the Griffith Journal of Law & Human Dignity. They have also raised intersex awareness in Buzzfeed, Teen Vogue, CNN, AP, NBC, Washington Post, Al Jazeera and HuffPost.


Leading from the Middle

Kevin Purcell

Thursday, October 4 | 6:00 p.m. | PAC C/D

This workshop is being offered twice with a max seating capacity of 60 people per workshop. Content is the same for both workshops.  RSVP here for this workshop date.

Middle positions are those in which supervisors, middle managers, coaches, deans, department heads and others must function between the conflicting perspectives and demands of those above and below them. Leading from the middle identifies human systems patterns in organizations, communities, and nations. It provides specific leadership tips for each level of any human system and illuminates possibilities for change that empowered middles can make in organizations.

Participants will be divided into Tops, Middles, Bottoms and Customers and lead through two separate organization simulations.  A debrief and a short lecture based on the principles of Power and Systems founder, Barry Oshry, will follow.

Kevin Purcell is a prominent UIS alum. He retired as the Senior Manager of Organization Development at Microsoft Corp. Purcell has been an adjunct faculty in the College of Business at UIS since 2008. He has done consulting work with the Gates Foundation and Memorial Health Systems of Central Illinois.


A Mexicana-Chicana Cultural Worker’s LGBTQ Experience

Diana Solis

Monday, October 8 | 6:00 p.m. | Brookens Auditorium

Co-Sponsored by College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Women and Gender Studies, Sociology/Anthropology, Diversity Center, and Gender and Sexuality Student Services

To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and Queertober, community leader and cultural worker Diana Solís will shed light on the history and struggles of Mexican immigrants in Chicago through her own experiences and engagements growing up, documenting, and educating youth in the Pilsen neighborhood, the heart of Mexican Chicago and the Midwest. She will share her experiences participating in and documenting early Latina feminist organizing with Mujeres Latinas en Accion (Latina Women in Action) and her search for acceptance and community as a woman-loving-woman of color starting in the ’70s. She will also share her transnational life and travels through Mexico that included helping to found Cuarto Cresciente, the first lesbian feminist space in Mexico City and circulating with some of the preeminent Mexican women writers, thinkers, and artists of the 20th Century.

Diana Solís is an educator, community leader, and artist born in Monterrey, México, but has made Chicago her home. Solís was honored with the first solo exhibition (1987) of her documentary photography of Mexican Chicago at the National Museum of Mexican Art. As both a participant in and observer of growing Mexican, women’s, and LGBTQ communities, arts, and activism in Chicago, her early portraits feature the vitality of daily working class life and important figures and artistic organizations of Latino Chicago that include American Book Award recipient and Macarthur fellow Sandra Cisneros and the Latino Chicago Theater Company. Deeply rooted in Pilsen and broadly traveled and trained in Chicago, Mexico, and Europe, Solís helped to found the first lesbian feminist space in Mexico City. A graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago, Solís has taught for over 30 years with many art programs and community art partnerships in Chicago.


PostSecret: Creating Community through Confessions

Frank Warren

Wednesday October 17 | 7:00 p.m. | Student Union Ballroom

Frank Warren, PostSecret founder, will discuss the process of creating community through confession and finding power in susceptibility. Warren started the PostSecret project in 2004, in which he invited strangers to anonymously reveal their secrets on a homemade postcard. This simple act resulted in over a million postcards being sent from around the world. His work has been featured in the Museum of Modern Art and the Smithsonian. Too often we are silenced by our own vulnerabilities. This event will encourage individuals to reflect upon ways to encourage our interpersonal connections.

Engage in UIS’s own PostSecret project! Information will be provided about the postcard collection boxes around campus.

Frank Warren, Springfield High School graduate, is excited to return to his hometown to share how a simple act of inviting strangers to anonymously share their secrets on postcards resulted in a global phenomenon. These postcards have been featured in five New York Times bestselling books. In 2001, Warren was awarded the HopeLine Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to suicide prevention and has been invited to the White House to share his work surrounding issues of mental illness. Warrens currently lives in Germantown, Maryland with his wife and daughter.


Leading from the Middle

Kevin Purcell

Wednesday, October 24 | 6:00 p.m. | PAC C/D

This workshop is being offered twice with a max seating capacity of 60 people per workshop. Content is the same for both workshops.  RSVP here for this workshop date.

Middle positions are those in which supervisors, middle managers, coaches, deans, department heads and others must function between the conflicting perspectives and demands of those above and below them. Leading from the middle identifies human systems patterns in organizations, communities, and nations. It provides specific leadership tips for each level of any human system and illuminates possibilities for change that empowered middles can make in organizations.

Participants will be divided into Tops, Middles, Bottoms and Customers and lead through two separate organization simulations.  A debrief and a short lecture based on the principles of Power and Systems founder, Barry Oshry, will follow.

Kevin Purcell is a prominent UIS alum. He retired as the Senior Manager of Organization Development at Microsoft Corp. Purcell has been an adjunct faculty in the College of Business at UIS since 2008. He has done consulting work with the Gates Foundation and Memorial Health Systems of Central Illinois.


What Happened in the 2016 Election? The Changing American Voter in 2016 and Beyond

Luis Ricardo Fraga

Monday, October 29 | 7:00 p.m. | Student Union Ballroom

Hesburgh Lecture

Co-Sponsored by Notre Dame Club of Central IL

The 2016 election produced results that few scholars and pundits predicted. How do we reconcile the results of the 2016 election with the reality that the nation is now more ethnically and racially diverse than at any other time since WWII? What does 2016 help us understand about the future of American elections? What are the likely consequences of the choices our country’s leaders and citizens make on future generations of Americans?

Luis Ricardo Fraga is the Director of the Institute for Latino Studies, the Acting Chair of the Department of Political Science, the Notre Dame Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership, the Joseph and Elizabeth Robbie Professor of Political Science and a Fellow for the Institute for Educational Initiatives at the University of Notre Dame. He has been on the faculty at the University of Washington, Stanford University, and the University of Oklahoma. He is a native of Corpus Christi, Texas. He received his A.B., cum laude, from Harvard University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Rice University. His primary interests are in American politics where he specializes in the politics of race and ethnicity, Latino politics, immigration policy, education politics, voting rights policy, and urban politics. His most recent co-authored book is Latinos in the New Millennium: An Almanac of Opinion, Behavior, and Policy Preferences (Cambridge University Press 2012).


Spielberg, Diddy, Oprah and Me (tentative title)

Tempesst Hazel and Stephanie Graham

Thursday, November 1 | 5:30 p.m. | Brookens Auditorium

Co-Sponsored by UIS Visual Arts Gallery and Illinois Arts Council

Curator, writer, and artist advocate Tempestt Hazel will give a lecture and lead a discussion/Q&A session with Chicago artist Stephanie Graham, whose work will be exhibited in the UIS Visual Arts Gallery concurrent with the ECCE Speaker Series event. As an African-American artist, Graham’s photographs, videos, and installations are armed with humor, satire, and soul in an effort to make easier and more comfortable otherwise difficult conversations about race and gender in an increasingly divisive political and cultural climate. Hazel will give a brief talk about the work she has done independently and collaboratively through various organizations such as Sixty Inches from Center to promote art and artists who work along the margins outside of mainstream historical narratives across the spectrum of gender, race, ability, and being. She will then sit down with Stephanie Graham to discuss the content of her work in general, her exhibition at the Visual Arts Gallery in particular, and its timeliness amidst recent developments in art, politics, and society.

Stephanie Graham is a Chicago-based artist who makes work about subcultures, social class, relationships and Black America. Her projects have been presented at the Hyde Park Art Center, Mana Contemporary (Chicago), Chicago Artist Coalition, and Terrain Exhibitions, and the Gene Siskel Film Center. Graham’s work has been featured in Studio Photography Magazine and the Chicago Alliance of African American Photographers. Her work is held in the public collection of the Chicago Historical Society.

Tempestt Hazel is a curator, writer, and founding editor of Sixty Inches From Center. She is the Art Program Officer for the Field Foundation of Illinois. Hazel has developed programming for Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, Chicago Artist Coalition, and the University of Chicago. Exhibitions and research have been produced with the University of North Texas, South Side Community Art Center, and Black Metropolis Research Consortium. Her writing has been published by UChicago Press, Candor Arts, and for Artslant, the Broad Museum (Lansing), and Duke University.


Blacks in Green: Principles of Green Village Building

Naomi Davis

Friday, November 9 | 6:00 p.m. | Brookens Auditorium

Co-Sponsored by UIS Sustainability Committee

Naomi Davis is the founder of “Blacks in Green” based in Chicago (blacksingreen.org). She is working on urban systems to build green local economies in black communities. The vision of her organization is to create walkable, vibrant, villages where people work, live, learn, and play. Her approach is whole-system, combining principles of micro-lending, local renewable energy generation, low income green housing, and green epicenters to build strong urban communities.

Naomi Davis is an attorney, entrepreneur, activist, and granddaughter of Mississippi sharecroppers. She is President and Founder of Blacks in Green (TM). This organization seeks to foster green villages in black communities using a whole systems approach. Naomi lives in Chicago and serves on the boards of the Illinois League of Conservation Voters and Climate Justice Chicago; the Steering Committees of the Chicagoland Green Collar Jobs Initiative, Chicago Green Jobs For All, amongst other groups.