Kami R. Branom: Sometimes impossible is possible

Kami Branom
Above: Kami Branom

On paper, Kami Branom looks less than likely to succeed. Her parents were drug addicts, she suffered domestic abuse as a child and through her teenage years, and she became pregnant as a teenager.

“Those facts could easily have defined the rest of my life,” she says, “but I was not going to let any statistic tell me what I can and cannot do.”

And succeed she has.

This year she will be graduating with her undergraduate degree in Psychology from UIS—one of the first students to earn a degree through UIS’ new online psychology degree. Kami already has a job in her field. She started her job as a Geriatric Case Manager at ACM Care in Peoria the day before graduation.

Kami and her husband Karl, to whom she has been married for five years, have two children, Raiyna (8) and Karlee (5).

She was determined to graduate for the sake of her children: “I wanted to show my children that sometimes ‘impossible’ is possible and to follow their dreams.”

“I wanted to show my children that sometimes ‘impossible’ is possible and to follow their dreams.”

Kami attended Black Hawk Community College before transferring to UIS in Spring 2015. She found UIS through her own research and chose online for its convenience. She has been extremely satisfied with the UIS program, the knowledge of the instructors and their exceptional ability to teach online.

“All my psychology professors were excellent,” she says. “I found Abnormal Psychology with Dr. Keith Burton particularly interesting.”

Her greatest challenges were time management (Her husband helped with time management by taking care of the Raiyna and Karlee) and not being able to see classmates face to face to discuss assignments.

“It would be nice to have some form of ‘chat’ screen,” she says, “for speaking with other classmates. There are discussions boards in many classed that offer the ability to communicate but there is not a notification letting you know that someone has a question. So unless you have a question you do not notice that others need assistance.”

Instead of classmates, she became extremely comfortable asking her professors to clarify instructors. “The advisors and teachers are amazing,” she says. “They all make you feel like that they want you to succeed. It is almost as if they have invested in you.”

“The advisors and teachers are amazing,” she says. “They all make you feel like that they want you to succeed. It is almost as if they have invested in you.”

With her degree completed, she plans to find work in a job helping others until she can attend graduate school—to study neuropsychology.

It’s a good thing Kami knows how to make the impossible happen!