Transition Words

Transition words and phrases work to connect ideas meaningfully. Because ideas can be related to one another in a variety of ways, writers should intentionally and carefully select the words and phrases that best fit the particular situation or purpose of their writing. The following are some of the most commonly used transition words with brief descriptions and sentences using them in context.

Common Transition Words

Although

“Although” is used to contrast one idea with another in the same sentence. Generally, it is used in the first clause of the sentence to indicate “in spite of this,” and then the second clause of the sentence negates the first.

Example: Although Grumpy Cat looks mean, she actually has a very sweet demeanor.

However

“However” is also used to contrast ideas, but is not restricted to contrasting ideas in a single sentence. It often substitutes for “but.”

Example: My favorite Internet Cat is Oskar the blind cat. However, my friends prefer Lil’ Bub.

Then

“Then” indicates either timing or cause/effect. It can be used by itself, or with “if.”

Timing:  We can watch Nyan Cat, but then we have to work on our homework.

Cause/Effect: If the cat can finally has the cheezburger, then the internet will end.

While

“While” can describe two events occurring at the same time, or it can indicate contrasting ideas.

Simultaneous Events: While Colonel Meow was commanding his army, Peace Cat was staging a sit-in.

Contrasting Ideas: While Colonel Meow has a frightening appearance, he is enjoyable to watch.

Also

“Also” is a word known to mean “in addition to”.

Example: Kevin watches cat videos every day before school. Also, he watches them when he gets home from soccer practice.

Therefore

“Therefore” is used to summarize. It also signifies the importance or effect of an action or event.

Cause/Effect: After watching so many Grumpy Cat videos, I decided I wanted my own cat for Christmas. Therefore, I wrote it down on my list.

Because

“Because” indicates the reasoning for an action or event.

Example: I like Grumpy Cat better than Snoopy the Cat because I think our shared surliness makes us kindred spirits.

In fact

“In fact” is a phrase that clarifies the truthfulness of a statement.

Example: According to several internet polls, Cooper is one of the most famous internet felines. In fact, I think the lightweight digital camera he wears makes him more popular.

After all

“After all” is used to settle a contradiction of earlier trouble or complication.

Example: I can’t imagine anyone disliking Nala. After all, who can detest a cat named after a character from The Lion King?

For example

“For example” is used to introduce a piece of information that supports an idea.

Example: There are several reasons I think Lil Bub looks cuddlier than all the other internet cats. For example, her big eyes and angelic face make her the cutest feline.

Categories of Transitions Words and Examples

Comparison

Contrast

Sequence/Time

Place

Summary

Examples

Cause/Effect

Emphasis

Qualification/Concession

Comparison

Again

And

Also

As well (as)

Comparably

Corresponding

Equally

Further more

In addition (to)

In the same way

Like

Likewise

Moreover

Similarly

Too

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Contrast

After all

Although

At least

But

By contrast

Conversely

Even so

Even though

Granted

However

In contrast (to)

In spite of

Nevertheless

Not

Only

On the contrary

On the other hand

Or

Otherwise

Still

Unlike

Whereas

Yet

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Sequence/Time

After/Afterward

Last

All this time

Later

As soon as

Lately

At last

Meanwhile

Not long after

Next

At the same time

Now

Before

Previously

Currently

Shortly

During

Simultaneously

Earlier

Since

Eventually

Soon

Finally

Subsequently

First, Second, etc.

Temporarily

Following

Then

Formerly

Thereafter

Immediately

Until

In the first place

When

In the future

While

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Place

Above

Adjacent to

Below

Beneath

Beside

Close by

Far away

Further back

Here

In the distance

In the foreground

Near at hand

Nearby

On the other side

Opposite

There

To the right/left

Under

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Summary

Consequently

Finally

In a word

In brief

In conclusion

In fact

In other words

In short

In summation

On the whole

That is

Therefore

Thus

To conclude

To sum up

To summarize

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Examples

As an example

For example

For instance

In particular

Like

Namely

Specifically

Such as

That is

Thus

To

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Cause/Effect

Accordingly

As a consequence

As a result (of)

Because

Consequently

Due to

Resulting from

Since

So

Then

Therefore

Thus

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Emphasis

Additionally

Incidentally

Assuredly

Indeed

Certainly

It is true

Clearly

Moreover

Equally

Perhaps

Especially

Naturally

Even more

Obviously

Evidently

Of course

Furthermore

Similarly

In addition (to)

Surely

In fact

Truly

In truth

Understandably

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Qualification/Concession

Admittedly

For the most part

Mainly

Sometimes

After all

Granted

Naturally

To be sure

In most cases

Of course

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