Environmental Studies – Adjunct opportunities

  • View the department’s web page
  • Adjunct opportunities in Environmental Studies: The Department of Environmental Studies occasionally has a need for adjuncts to teach the following courses:
    • ENS 151 Earth Science.  Online or on-campus.  This general education course introduces the physical processes and materials on our planet including natural resources, natural disasters, and climate. Understanding the dynamics that make up Earth and the discoveries leading to this understanding allows us to grasp the impact the Earth has on society and our impact on the Earth.  Applicants should have a diverse background in the natural sciences.
    • ENS 201 Literature and the Environment.  Online.  This general education course examines the historical chronology of literature addressing the relationship between humans and the environment.  Applicants should have a strong background in literary and cultural studies and familiarity with interdisciplinary fields such as conservation biology, environmental history, and environmental philosophy.
    • ENS 262 Environmental Physical Geography.  Online or on-campus.  This general education course examines the physical elements of the landscape, focusing on weather, water, landforms, and soils.  Interrelationships between the various environmental elements and their influence on the changing natural landscape are noted.  Applicants should have a degree in geography, geology, or closely related physical science.
    • ENS 311  Global Change in Local Places.  Online or on-campus.  This course examines environmental transformations in a global perspective, seeking to understand how changes in global social systems and natural systems are interrelated.  The course develops a deeper understanding of the ways that global social processes affect diverse communities throughout the world by focusing on environmental change and social justice and the resulting impact on human communities.  Applicants should have experience developing interdisciplinary analysis that draws on both social and natural sciences.
    • ENS 404 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems.  Online and on-campus.  This is an introduction to the concepts and tools of GIS emphasizing basic concepts of design and application of GIS in a variety of fields.  Applicants must have significant professional experience using ArcGIS and be aware of the time commitment involved in a course such as this that requires close supervision of students.
    • ENS 405 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing.  Online and on-campus.  This course introduces students to the principles and techniques necessary for applying remote sensing to issues in natural resources, emphasizing the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings in both aerial and satellite remote sensing.  Applicants must have significant professional experience using ArcGIS and be aware of the time commitment involved in a course such as this that requires close supervision of students.
    • ENS 422 Environmental Sociology.  Online.  This course provides an introduction to the key areas of research in environmental sociology, a field of inquiry that focuses on the relationship between society and the biophysical environment.  Applicants should have a degree in sociology of closely related field.
    • ENS 425 Ecology Issues.  Online.  This course introduces students to the basic concepts and models of ecology, divided into sections that consider the most important ecological factors influencing individuals, populations, and communities.  Applicants should have a degree in the biological sciences.
    • ENS 446 Population and Public Policy.  Online.  This course studies the size, composition, distribution, and socio-economic aspects of local, national, and global populations using multidisciplinary approaches.  Focus is on the interactions between population growth, economic development, and environmental qualities.  Applicants should have a social background in demography.
    • ENS 449 Agricultural Politics & Policy.  Online.  This course explores how various political forces have shaped food production (primarily in the United States) and current trends and controversies (including agricultural subsidies, conservation programs, agrochemicals, biotechnology, food safety, organic farming, and distributions of farmlands).  Applicants should have a degree in political science, public administration, legal studies, or closely related field.
    • ENS 461 Geopolitics.  Online.  This course examines strategic geopolitical issues (both conflict and opportunity), including issues relating to food, natural resources, population change, and technological development.  Applicants should have a degree in human geography or closely related field.
    • ENS 465 Water Resources and Society.  Online. Beginning with a historical perspective on human use and influence of water, this course samples the basics of the hydrologic cycle and water science, water quality and quantity issues, and resulting conflicts.  Applicants should have a degree in geology, physical geography, or closely related field.
    • ENS 477 Renewable Energy.  Online.  This course provides an overview of renewable energy, including technologies such as passive and active solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind turbines, hydropower, biomass, and alternative transportation.  Students will learn about the basics of energy, energy conservation strategies, energy-efficient design principles, and energy-related careers.  Applicants should have professional experience in some aspect of renewable energy technology.
    • ENS 485 Environmental Policies: Water Quality.  Online.  This course focuses on analysis of administrative procedures, standards, and regulations of the Clean Water Act of 1987 and amendments, and their effects on water quality.  Applicants should have a degree or practical experience in environmental policy or law.
    • ENS 553 Research Methods in Environmental Studies.  Online or on-campus.  This course focuses on improving skills in critical thinking, environmental research design, and data analysis.  Applicants must have knowledge of basic statistical analysis, analytical writing, and policies regarding use of human and animal subjects in research.
  • Link to adjunct application FAQs
  • Application Part 1: Submit required application materials (please use pdf format, and name documents as last name-first name-document type-YYYY-MO-DA; example: Garcia-Amy-coverletter-2018-6-8). If you do not have an email client installed on your computer, you can right-click the link above and choose “Copy Shortcut”. Paste the link in the “To:” line of your email and remove the “mailto:” prefix. 
    • Cover letter
    • CV/resume
    • Unofficial transcript(s)

The department will follow up with applicants whose credentials and experience appear to be a match with their current needs; they may not have an opportunity to acknowledge all applications.