IHECS – Institue Des Hautes Etudes Des Communications Sociales

The Institute for the Higher Study of Social Communication is located in the center of the city of Brussels, Belgium. It focuses solely on the field of Communications with an emphasis on practical application. Their website, in French, can be found here.

Details on the program of study offered to exchange students, in English, can be found below.

2013-2014 Program

Full English Program:
• Welcome Session: first week of September (2nd – 6th September)
• French Immersion week: second week of September (9th – 14th September)
• Beginning of Courses: 16th September 2013

French Program:
Students willing to get into our French programs can find the offers on our Webpage. Access to courses in French is caution to a French language test.

Students Nominations:
Students are nominated by their home institution to spend a Semester or a year at IHECS. They will first have to contact their study abroad coordinator to learn about selection procedure.

 

Program – Fall semester

Course number
Course title
ECTS
Lengh
Language
Compulsory /optional

Timing
WELF01 Welcome session and integration week: courses, seminars and visits relating to Europe, Belgium, IHECS and Belgian medias 4 30H English compulsory 1st week September
FALL03 European Lobbying 5 30H English 2 courses compulsory amongst those 3 Fall Semester
FALL04 European institutions – their communication policy: course and visits 5 30H English FallSemester
FALL05 Communication for non-profit organization and communication for politics 5 30H English FallSemester
BLOF06 Immersion weeks of practical work in multi-media 6 60H English compulsory 2 weeks in December
FALL07 Vested interests and current affairs 4 30H English optional Fall Semestre
FALL08 Globalization 4 30H English optional Fall Semester
FALL09 Internal and external communication of European interests groups 4 30H English optional Fall Semester
FALL10 General principles of knowledge management 4 30H English optional Fall Semester
FALL11 Change management and knowledge communication 4 30H English optional Fall Semester
FALL12 Cultural studies 4 30H English optional Fall Semester
FALL13 Intercultural communication 4 30H English optional Fall Semester
PHOF14 Practice course : photography 5 30H English optional Fall Semester
VIDF15 Practice course : video and television 5 30H English optional Fall Semester
MULF16 Practice course : multimedia 5 30H English optional Fall Semester
IMM02 French immersion week: language course for beginners 2 15H French optional 2nd week September
FREF17 French language course 5 30H French optional Fall Semester

Program – Spring semester

Course number
Course title
ECTS
Lengh
Language
Compulsory /optional

Timing
WELS01 Welcome session and integration week: courses, seminars and visits relating to Europe, Belgium, IHECS and Belgian medias 4 30H English Compulsory 1 week end of January
SPRI01 European institutions communication flows: current events, case analyses and visits 5 30H English 2 courses compulsory amongst those 3 Spring Semester
SPRI02 European culture and its specifics 5 30H English SpringSemester
SPRI03 Media literacy 5 30H English SpringSemester
BLOS04 Immersion week of practical work in multi-media 6 60H English compulsory 2 weeks in May
SPRI05 Research and Evaluation in Public relations 4 30H English optional SpringSemestre
SPRI06 Public relations tools and case studies 4 30H English optional Spring Semester
SPRI07 Issues in Marketing communication 4 30H English optional Spring Semester
PHOS08 Practice course: photography 5 30H English optional Spring Semester
VIDS09 Practice course: video and television 5 30H English optional Spring Semester
MULS10 Practice course: multimedia 5 30H English optional Spring Semester
FRES11 French language course 4 30H French optional Spring Semester
Courses description

FALL SEMESTER:
WELC01 Welcome session and integration week: courses, seminars and visits relating to Europe, Belgium, IHECS and Belgian medias
FALL03 European Lobbying
FALL04 European institutions – their communication policy: course and visits
FALL05 Communication for non-profit organization and communication for politics
BLOF06 Immersion weeks of practical work in multi-media

The above courses will be created especially for the new “Full English program”. They are in preparation and will start only in September 2013. Course descriptions will follow.

FALL07: Vested interests and current affairs

Teacher:Régine Florent

Objective:Draw attention to matters of interest linked to decisions taken in the political, economic and media fields. Arouse curiosity and the desire to know more and understand better what is at stake.

Brief outline:This course looks at vested interests that influence decision-making in the worlds of politics, industry and media. It focuses for example on the pharmaceutical industry, on the attitude of decision-makers in the field of climate change, on the media (chiefly in the USA), on issues associated with access to energy, natural resources (petroleum, gas, water, uranium, diamonds, etc.); this list is not exhaustive and continually evolves with current affairs. The course is based on a selection of documents sent to students and examined before the course: video or audio documentaries and press kits, mainly taken from the weekly magazine ‘The Economist’. Students are asked to make personal contributions which will enhance classes. A list of many potential sources is provided to that end. This preparation will result in a class discussion examining the interests at stake in the topical areas tackled, interests that often throw up new issues for the class to investigate.

Work/Evaluation:Weekly preparatory work. Oral exam (with files) at the semester’s end.

Resources:Documentation available on I-campus before the course and then on the IHECS server.

Bibliography:http://www.economist.com/

http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/

http://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/

http://pewresearch.org/

FALL08: Globalisation

Teacher:Mathieu de Wasseige

Objective:This course has two objectives. Firstly, it offers students an academic course on globalisation. Secondly, it provides an academic and seminar setting for an interdisciplinary survey of major approaches to the study of globalisation, in order to help students better understand the world that we live in. It also offers aframework to better understand subsequent courses – dealing for example with the cultural industries, communication and development, and intercultural communication.

Brief outline:The course tries to put the concept of globalisation into perspective, by comparing it with the concept of Americanisation. Emphasis will therefore be placed on the development of the US as a hyperpower and its relationship to global developments, from its origins to the present day. Influential definitions of globalisation will then be analysed and students will be introduced to some of the major topics in the literature on globalisation. This course will subsequently provide a seminar setting for the discussion of various key issues in the globalisation debate: culture, media, cultural identity, citizenship, governance, global economy, health, environment and development.

Work/Evaluation:A mid-term paper must be submitted early November. It includes a 500-to-1000 word personal summary and a 500-to-600 word personal review of a recent scientific article (5,000/10,000 words, publication 2007-2011 for journals, 2009-2011 for books) that deals with globalisation. Paper /20; Paper presentation /10; Oral exam /30.

Bibliography: APPADURAI Arjun (Ed.), 2001, Globalization, Durham & London, Duke University Press. | COWEN Tyler, 2004, Creative Destruction. How Globalization is Changing the World’s Culture 4th Printing, Princeton and Oxford, Princeton University Press. | HELD David &McGREW Anthony, 2003, The Global Transformation Reader, An Introduction to the Globalization Debate, 2nd edition, Cambridge, Polity Press. | OSTERHAMMEL J. & PETERSSON N., 2005, Globalization: A Short History, Princeton and Oxford, Princeton University Press. | TOMLINSON John, 1999, Globalization and Culture, Chicago, The University of Chicago Press.

FALL09:Internal and external communication of European interest groups

Teacher: Jean-Pierre Geets

Objective:The focus is on developing skills, thus boosting students’ employability. These skills include discipline, organisation, independence, initiative, creativity, meeting deadlines (resistance to stress, prioritisation), and managing interpersonal relationships. Students are evaluated on the operational capacities they have acquired and not on their ability to recall content.

Brief outline:Active participation in course sessions is vital.
Classes are organised like a mini-company, with project teams of four or five students. The teams are randomly put together and may choose a project manager if they so wish (this has no impact on the evaluation). Each team must complete a project and present its results at the final session.
Each project is linked to an interest group or an organisation that lobbies the European institutions. The work includes a descriptive part (summary of the communication means/methods), a reflective part (critical analysis of communication methods from the viewpoint of effectiveness), and a creative part (recommendations made to the organisation). Group coaching is provided on demand and should be prepared (problems faced and solutions proposed by the group). Individual coaching is at the initiative of the teacher. Each student must keep a session-by-session ‘diary’ (the workgroup’s progress, individuals’ progress, and personal impressions). This is a communication tool for interacting with the teacher and it can take any form; nevertheless, creativity is encouraged. Students are also interviewed individually in an informal way (outside the evaluation area). The strictest confidentiality is observed, for both the diary and the interview.
The content, both theoretical and factual, is not the subject of ex-caethedra classes; instead it is actively researched and detailed according to the needs of projects. The goal is to develop students’ ability to do research, and to analyse and summarise what they have researched.

Work/Evaluation:Evaluation is done throughout the process and is mainly based on the workgroup, while taking into account individual differences (moderate). There is a meeting with the teacher, rather than an exam.

FALL10:General principles of knowledge management

Teacher:Pierre de Villers

Objective:There are two objectives: to provide a comprehensive overview of the setting up of a knowledge management strategy; and to encourage students to make use of the techniques and tools explored during the course.

Brief outline:This course is generally divided into two hours of teaching and two hours of coaching.
The course’s structure is as follows:
– Concepts and definitions
– Identifying current knowledge
– Anticipating future knowledge needs
– Formalising and validating knowledge
– Sharing knowledge
– Organising knowledge
– Disseminating and making use of knowledge.
There is an explanation of the different tools and technologies and each technique is assessed through real case studies.

Work/Evaluation:Workgroups are created to help students grasp the various forms of knowledge proposed during the course. The evaluation is based on a presentation of the results of this work.

Resources:The course is built around an extensive PowerPoint presentation, featuring numerous videos and company documents. A syllabus is also offered to the students.
These two media can be downloaded from the IHECS I-campus.

Bibliography:BALMISSE G., 2004, Guide des outils du knowledge management, Vuibert Entreprendre.
PRAX J-Y., 2007, Manuel du knowledge management, Dunod.
ROULLEAUX-DUGAGE M., 2007, Organisation 2.0: le knowledge management nouvelle génération, Eyrolles.

FALL11: Change management and knowledge communication

Teacher:Pierre de Villers

Objective:This course has three objectives. The first is to teach students about the nature of change and support for this process. The second is to raise students’ awareness of critical phases in the process of change, and how to choose the most appropriate support method. The third and final objective revolves around anchoring the knowledge society in change.

Brief outline:Generally speaking, a two-hour lecture is followed by two hours (often more) of group work coaching. The course has the following structure: definition and contextualisation of change, the formula and models of Levin and Judson, Gleicher’s formula, the ADKAR model, the competing theories of ‘dynamic conservatism’ (Donald Schön) and dissipative structures (Prigogine), and “the map is not the territory” (The ladder of inference by Chris Argyris). Each theoretical approach is illustrated by one or more real case studies and numerous videos.

 

FALL12:Cultural studies

Teacher:Mathieu de Wasseige

Objective:This course aims to provide students with sufficient theoretical tools and practical knowledge to decipher the cultural industries’ products and to prepare future media-literacy seminars

Brief outline:After receiving a brief presentation on the evolution of cultural studies (CS), students participate in seminars about the leading theoretical questions that are of interest in the study of popular culture’s products. After the theory, two classes are devoted to a presentation by the teacher of a CS analysis of a contemporary US TV series.
Subsequently, students choose a popular product of the cultural industries. They analyse it and present the results of their analysis to their fellow students.

Work/Evaluation:Preparation and presentation of a seminar on CS theory. (/10) Analysis of a popular product of the cultural industries.Presentation of the latter in class. (/20) Written Exam.(/30).

FALL13: Intercultural communication

Teacher:Florence Vandendorp

Objective:The course aims to raise awareness of problems arising from communication between people and groups from various different cultures. Initially, that means having an awareness of one’s own culture and then insight into the main cultural differences.

Brief outline:The first chapter strives to define intercultural communication as a field of applied transcultural psychology. It ends by distinguishing between objective and subjective cultural distance.
Chapter two deals with the dimensions of differences between cultures, as proposed by Hofstede (1991), Trompenaars et Al. (2008), and various others authors and their critics.
Chapter three looks at religious practices as a source of difference and intercultural conflicts. It offers a brief overview of diverse religious practices worldwide. The discussion only tackles doctrinal differences where they underpin everyday concepts and the practices of believers.
Chapter four looks at intercultural conflict as a means of communication and efforts to find solutions through the intercultural negotiation model of Pinxten (1994), as well as the question of intercultural citizenship proposed by Kymlicka (1995). It ends with an exploration of the notion of ‘rooted cosmopolitanism’ as proposed by Appiah (2005 & 2006).
(2005 & 2006).

PHOF14:Practice course: Photo

Media teacher:Laurent Poma

Objective:Encourage students to learn theory by putting it into action. Create a photographic research subject, based on a title proposed by the teachers. Envision a photographic subject. Use a digital reflex camera with the aim of communicating a message. Control a viewer’s interpretation of a photo. Apply photographic grammar. Edit and format images to make a coherent presentation.

Brief outline:
The course is divided into six sessions. 1st session: general presentation of the objectives, the production expected, and evaluation methods; 2nd session: sharing of ideas for subjects in a large group, individualised discussions of conceptual details; 3rd session: training on how to search for referees; Workshops – meeting with the students – project development based on cross-analysis by the teachers; The following sessions are shared between training on image processing, training on image processing software, and follow-up of individual work.

Organisation of the activity:In the first four months, work is organised around a title: ‘Portrait of a professional or sports-person’. Each student chooses the character he/she will photograph for his/her portrait.
Working with a general theme proposed by the teachers, students will familiarise themselves with their camera, photographic grammar, and basic shooting techniques. The work is focused on defining efficient communication. Students are invited to develop their research in a portfolio in the given format. This is a book of 80 blank pages, which students will use as a notebook, workbook, personal account, and even a personal diary. It is used to record everything learned: practical exercises, referees, resources, personal notes, possibly decorations and highlights of work produced, appraisals, a formative and summary scorecard, objectives, final production and so on. It also serves as a special exchange tool between the student and teacher. Each student has a different project, chosen according to their own interests.

Work/Evaluation:
Work requested: each student must make a presentation in the final evaluation. It will include a portrait of a professional or a sports-person in four images and a personal project. Continual and formative evaluation: each student will regularly show the teacher the progress made in his/her photographic project during workshops. Final evaluation – exam: criterion-referenced evaluation. For this, each student will present his/her finalised photographic project as well as his/her progress in a portfolio. The ECTS evaluation scale is used for each evaluation criterion.

Resources:
Students are given a digital reflex type camera and have access to equipment in the lending centre.
Nine NIKON D70/D90 digital cameras; A range of lenses from 20mm to 200mm; 15 tripods; FUJI FRONTIER: a minilab for A4 digital printing with control terminals; A computer room with Apple Mac computers.
Location: Studios and photo laboratory; a projector room.

 

VIDF15: Practice course: TV-Video

Media teacher:Valentine Penders

Objective:A practical approach to TV video production through rational learning of techniques and the steps necessary for TV video production (statement of intent, storyboard, location scouting, filming, lighting, sound recording, logging, editing).
Learning to use tools (camera, lighting, editing equipment, etc.) and audiovisual writing specific for TV video.

Brief outline:The course is based on producing a portrait documentary (filming outdoors + editing).
The module takes a theoretical approach, with a focus on practice: writing a statement of intent, storyboard, filming (scale plans, camera movements, framing, 30° rule, etc.), the interview, lighting, editing (Kuleshov Effect, 180° rule, axis jump, shot/reverse shot, link shot, rhythm, etc.).
The teachers are responsible for providing practical support to students, following the main stages of the project’s production from conception through to final editing. For this work, students are given a specification document with the requirements and work steps.

Work/Evaluation:Students work in teams of five people. Each team must produce a portrait lasting 2’30”, outdoors filming (one day), editing on Final Cut Pro (one evening) according to the schedule fixed at the semester’s start. A critical screening of the work is held in front of the class, at the semester’s end.
The evaluation is based as much on the conception (writing) as on the technical production.

Resources:Equipment for filming outdoors (HD camera + lighting kit) is available from the lending centre.
– Final Cut Pro editing suites.

Rooms:video studio + room 228.

MULF16:Practice course: Multimedia

Media teacher:TahlehDaryanavard or Hubert Delouvroy

Objective:Learning and mastering the skills to design and make a website in HTML/CSS.
Learning and mastering the concept of organising information on a website. Transposing and adapting a ‘paper’ visual identity theme for the web.

Brief outline:Designing and making a website in HTML/CSS, so that students think in theoretical and practical terms about static web technologies in communication.

Work/Evaluation:Students must design and make a static website using DREAMWEAVER and PHOTOSHOP software.
The analytical side of the work will be presented as a production file. This will include everything from site objectives to an analysis of target audiences, plus a description of the strategy implemented a tree structure, and the pages’ written content.
The exercise’s practical side involves making a static website.

Resources:iMAC computer – Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium software.

SPRING SEMESTER:

SPRI01 European institutions communication flows: current events, case analyses and visits
SPRI02 European culture and its specifics
SPRI03 Media literacy
BLOS04 Immersion week of practical work in multi-media

The above courses will be created especially for the new “Full English program”. They are in preparation and will start only in February 2014. Course descriptions will follow.
SPRI05: Research and evaluation in public relations

Teacher: Pierre de Villers

Objective:The course’s objectives include: acquiring knowledge; understanding the communication and organisational challenges; and learning how to use the strategies and techniques that are essential for using social media and organisation storytelling.

Brief outline:The course is delivered in sessions of lectures and coached group work. It is based on two approaches: the use of storytelling resources in corporate communication; and support provided by social media for this narrative. Many case studies will be used to back up the theory and students will be given an analysis of all the latest trends in social media.

Work/Evaluation:The group work will be coached every two weeks. The aim is to develop a communication strategy that links storytelling to social media.
The evaluation will be based on a presentation of the results of this work.

Resources: The course calls on extensive presentation of slideshows and numerous videos, in addition to documents. All media materials used in the course are genuine. Course notes and the presentation of slideshows are made available to students on the IHECS I-campus.

Bibliography:DENNING S., 2005, The leader’s guide to storytelling: mastering the art and discipline of business narrative, Jossey-Bass FOG K. et al., 2010; Storytelling: branding in practice, Springer Verlag SALMON C., 2008; Storytelling: la machine à fabriquer des histoires et à formater les esprits, La Découverte.

SPRI06:Public relations tools and case studies

Teacher:Pierre de Villers

Objective:The course aims to present to students a range of public relations (PR) tools and techniques which can be used in a variety of professional situations. The theoretical concepts will be directly followed by the study of real-life cases.

Brief outline:
The chosen approach this year is intercultural communication. Students will first watch a video showing a negotiation between professionals from different cultures; they will then discuss the different stages. Each difficulty will be analysed and conclusions originating from the students’ observations will be linked to theoretical concepts. Next, students will be divided into groups and prepare a communication campaign for a country with diverse cultural, social and economic characteristics. The teacher will act as a coach for this work, enabling students to complete or correct their campaign.

Work/Evaluation:Students must participate actively in the classes and coaching (which is essential), and group work must be done and presented to the whole audience.

Resources:The course is based on a Powerpoint presentation which students can access via the IHECS I-Campus platform. Numerous video sequences help to place concepts seen during the course in a practical context.

Bibliography:HALL E T., 1988, The silent language, Bantam Doubleday Dell. HOFSTEDE G., 1994, Cultures and organizations: software of the mind, Harper Collins, Coll.; The successful strategist, TROMPENAARS F. & HAMPDEN TURNER C., 1997; Riding the waves of culture, Nicholas Brealey Publishing.

SPRI07: Issues in marketing communication

Teacher: Jean-Pierre Ranschaert

Objective:The course is entitled ‘LIVErtising’ and shows how marketing communication models have become more participative. Formerly designed to be ‘top-down’, unidirectional and interruptive, advertising evolved into a ‘bottom-up’ and bidirectional interaction based on permission. Today it is deployed as a network and on networks. This course encourages students to be aware of the technology, communication and societal challenges stemming from this paradigm shift.

Brief outline:The course is based on: 1. a weekly classroom activity, to get students participating and contributing, plus three sessions led by outside guests who practise participative communication; 2. content offered on a variety of course media: the blog, Twitter feed, and the Facebook LIVErtising page. It also includes an activity somewhat on the fringes of the LIVErtising theme: the reading of a work with links to marketing communication in the broadest sense (see description under the ‘Work requested’ point).

Work/Evaluation:1. Follow-up and content uploading to the course’s various media platforms (blog – Twitter feed – Facebook page); 2. Reading of a work with links to marketing communication in the broadest sense: selection, reading, writing an abstract, correction based on feedback, posting on the Forum, comments on the Forum, leading a roundtable, writing a final report; 3. Pitch based on a communication case on the social media, evaluated by a jury of outside guests who practise participative communication; 4. Oral exam.

Resources:
Blog and Forum: http://LIVErtising.be Twitter feed: http://http://twitter.com/#!/LIVErtising

Bibliography:Online bibliography: http://www.librarything.com/catalog/jpranschaert

PHOS08:Practice course: Photo

Media teacher:Laurent Poma

Objective:Encourage students to learn theory by putting it into action. Create a photographic research subject, based on a title proposed by the teachers. Envision a photographic subject. Use a digital reflex camera with the aim of communicating a message. Control a viewer’s interpretation of a photo. Apply photographic grammar. Edit and format images to make a coherent presentation.

Brief outline:
The course is divided into six sessions. 1st session: general presentation of the objectives, the production expected, and evaluation methods; 2nd session: sharing of ideas for subjects in a large group, individualised discussions of conceptual details; 3rd session: training on how to search for referees; Workshops – meeting with the students – project development based on cross-analysis by the teachers; The following sessions are shared between training on image processing, training on image processing software, and follow-up of individual work.

Organisation of the activity:In the first four months, work is organised around a title: ‘Portrait of a professional or sports-person’. Each student chooses the character he/she will photograph for his/her portrait.
Working with a general theme proposed by the teachers, students will familiarise themselves with their camera, photographic grammar, and basic shooting techniques. The work is focused on defining efficient communication. Students are invited to develop their research in a portfolio in the given format. This is a book of 80 blank pages, which students will use as a notebook, workbook, personal account, and even a personal diary. It is used to record everything learned: practical exercises, referees, resources, personal notes, possibly decorations and highlights of work produced, appraisals, a formative and summary scorecard, objectives, final production and so on. It also serves as a special exchange tool between the student and teacher. Each student has a different project, chosen according to their own interests.

Work/Evaluation:
Work requested: each student must make a presentation in the final evaluation. It will include a portrait of a professional or a sports-person in four images and a personal project. Continual and formative evaluation: each student will regularly show the teacher the progress made in his/her photographic project during workshops. Final evaluation – exam: criterion-referenced evaluation. For this, each student will present his/her finalised photographic project as well as his/her progress in a portfolio. The ECTS evaluation scale is used for each evaluation criterion.

Resources:
Students are given a digital reflex type camera and have access to equipment in the lending centre.
Nine NIKON D70/D90 digital cameras; A range of lenses from 20mm to 200mm; 15 tripods; FUJI FRONTIER: a minilab for A4 digital printing with control terminals; A computer room with Apple Mac computers.
Location: Studios and photo laboratory; a projector room.

 

VIDS09: Practice course: TV-Video

Media teacher:Valentine Penders

Objective:A practical approach to TV video production through rational learning of techniques and the steps necessary for TV video production (statement of intent, storyboard, location scouting, filming, lighting, sound recording, logging, editing).
Learning to use tools (camera, lighting, editing equipment, etc.) and audiovisual writing specific for TV video.

Brief outline:The course is based on producing a portrait documentary (filming outdoors + editing).
The module takes a theoretical approach, with a focus on practice: writing a statement of intent, storyboard, filming (scale plans, camera movements, framing, 30° rule, etc.), the interview, lighting, editing (Kuleshov Effect, 180° rule, axis jump, shot/reverse shot, link shot, rhythm, etc.).
The teachers are responsible for providing practical support to students, following the main stages of the project’s production from conception through to final editing. For this work, students are given a specification document with the requirements and work steps.

Work/Evaluation:Students work in teams of five people. Each team must produce a portrait lasting 2’30”, outdoors filming (one day), editing on Final Cut Pro (one evening) according to the schedule fixed at the semester’s start. A critical screening of the work is held in front of the class, at the semester’s end.
The evaluation is based as much on the conception (writing) as on the technical production.

Resources:Equipment for filming outdoors (HD camera + lighting kit) is available from the lending centre.
– Final Cut Pro editing suites.

Rooms:video studio + room 228.

MULS10:Practice course: Multimedia

Media teacher:TahlehDaryanavard or Hubert Delouvroy

Objective:Learning and mastering the skills to design and make a website in HTML/CSS.
Learning and mastering the concept of organising information on a website. Transposing and adapting a ‘paper’ visual identity theme for the web.

Brief outline:Designing and making a website in HTML/CSS, so that students think in theoretical and practical terms about static web technologies in communication.

Work/Evaluation:Students must design and make a static website using DREAMWEAVER and PHOTOSHOP software.
The analytical side of the work will be presented as a production file. This will include everything from site objectives to an analysis of target audiences, plus a description of the strategy implemented a tree structure, and the pages’ written content.
The exercise’s practical side involves making a static website.

Resources:iMAC computer – Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium software.