Courses

Current and Future Courses

The Social Justice Series (PDF)

  • Session 1 From Slavery to the Charleston Massacre: Racism and Racial Violence in America
    • Instructor: TBA
    • Date: TBD
    • Time: 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
    • Location: on-ground, webinar
    • Cost: $125
    • Registration for this session is not yet available. Please check back.

When Dylann Roof walked into the prayer meeting at Mother Emanuel and shot and killed six black women and three black men his actions were not simply one of a deranged and evil individual, but instead emerged from our nation’s long history of racial prejudice and violence against black Americans.

Racism has plagued the history of America, coming in many forms including segregation, intolerance, prejudice, discrimination, and violence. This course will examine the violent and blatant forms of American racism through the institution of slavery, the system of Jim Crow, the practice of lynching and race riots. Students will analyze and explore the events surrounding the practice of lynching and race riots through historical, cultural, social, and literary contexts.

This course will evoke critical thinking from students as they study how these violent acts preserved, perpetuated, disseminated, and maintained racism throughout American culture.

  • Session 2 The Black Church and the History of Black Resistance
    • Instructor: TBA
    • Date: TBD
    • Time: 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
    • Location: on-ground, webinar
    • Cost: $125
    • Registration for this session is not yet available. Please check back.

Since the emergence of black churches among free black populations living in cities throughout the U.S. in the late 18th century, the black church has been a historic symbol of black resistance to slavery and racism, serving as a centralizing force of spiritual support, educational opportunity, economic development, political activism and social justice. For white supremacists African American places of worship are a citadel of resistance to White supremacy and as such black churches have been prime targets of racial violence across time.

Through the examination of historical and contemporary scholarship on the Black church, this course will explore the role of Black churches in black resistance from slavery to the Charleston Massacre.

  • Session 3 The History of Race and Institutional Racism in America: From Slavery to the Present
    • Instructor: TBA
    • Date: TBD
    • Time: 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
    • Location: on-ground, webinar
    • Cost: $125
    • Registration for this session is not yet available. Please check back.

For some racism is viewed and interpreted through disparate and fragmented pieces often congealing briefing as a result of a series of news worthy events and/or sound bites. And as such, it is easily set aside, selectively remembered, dismissed entirely, and/or forgotten all together. We have been taught not to see racism as a pattern, or a system, or a structure, but as a mental quirk, as a psychological flaw, or as an individual spewing benign, but politically incorrect statements.

Race and racism are integral and inescapable parts of our American culture and history.

In this course students will examine the history and construction of race and structural racism and its impact and relationship to our social, political and economic systems.

  • Session 4 Fighting Racism in America
    • Instructor: TBA
    • Date: TBD
    • Time: 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
    • Location: on-ground, webinar
    • Cost: $125
    • Registration for this session is not yet available. Please check back.

How can it be that so many well-meaning white people have never thought about race when so few blacks pass a single day without being reminded of it? 
-Patricia Williams, Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race

Leadership can play a critical role in either contributing to racial justice or reinforcing prevailing patterns of racial inequality and exclusion. In an ever changing multicultural society, filled with cultural complexities, the role that leadership plays requires continual re-examination and reshaping to contribute in constructive ways to dismantling institutional racism in America today.

Participants will learn effective methods and strategies for dismantling structural and institutional racism in the workplace and in their communities. The course will:

  • provide participants with the understanding of the qualities, characteristics, skills and knowledge needed to be leader in social justice
  • provide participants with a framework that demonstrates the relationship between the history of the construction of race and institutional and structural racism in America
  • enable participants to connect the historical foundations, underlying assumptions, and current political and social racial dynamics that shape contemporary public debate about race and racism
  • help participants apply these insights to the social, economic, and political challenges in their own organizations or communities by creating a detailed racial equity plan and strategy