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University of Illinois Springfield

Academic Integrity University of Illinois Springfield

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Direct Quotations

Any verbatim use of written, oral, visual or audio material, no matter how large or small, must be clearly acknowledged. Whether only one key word is used or large blocks of text from the Internet are copied and pasted, quotation marks must be used to set off the borrowed text and the source must be cited. Using citations, numerical data, formulae and equations, or graphical or visual material requires proper citation. Multi-media material (from the internet, speeches and lectures, or films, television, radio and other visual or audio media) must be properly cited.

The direct use of print or other material must be accompanied by a proper citation. Information about how to properly cite can be found in style manuals and sites on APA or MLA citation found on academic sites like the UIS Center for Teaching and Learning.

Example 1*

Original version:

“Such ‘story myths’ are not told for their entertainment value. They provide answers to questions people ask about life, about society and about the world in which they live” (10).  Davidson, Robert. Genesis 1-11. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1973. (This example uses the MLA form of citation).

Plagiarized version:

Specifically, story myths are not for entertainment purpose, but serve as answers to questions people ask about life, about society and about the world in which they live.

Why this is plagiarism:

The plagiarist has copied words and phrases from the original without acknowledging their source. Although some phrases have been changed, the plagiarist still follows the basic wording and structure of the original sentence and repeats ideas as if they were his or her own.

Acceptable version:

Davidson explains that “story myths” answer “questions people ask about life, about society and about the world in which they live” (10).

Comment:

The student has used quotation marks for all the words that came directly from Davidson. While correct, using such extensive quotation would probably earn a poor grade if the paper was simply a string of quotations from other authors with little or no original thoughts from the student writer.

Better version:

“Story myths” are powerful because they deal with phenomena that people cannot understand in any other way. As Davidson explains, story myths have direct relevance to the everyday lives of their readers by “provid[ing] answers to questions” (10).

Comment:

The student writer has combined paraphrase and quotation that support an idea asserted by the student writer. By using quotations around “story myth,” and introducing the author of the source (Davidson) at the beginning of the second sentence, it is clear to readers exactly where the student writer begins using the source. The page reference clearly marks the end of that source material.

 

Example 2** 

Original version

Code A

Robert Sedgewick:. The following computer program appears on page 118 of the textbook Algorithms in C  (Addison Wesley, New York, 1990).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plagiarized version

Code BWhy this is plagiarism:

The plagiarist has taken the structure of the program exactly, changing only a few details that do not affect the meaning of the program. Though it looks different to the untrained eye, it has exactly the same meaning as the original program. This is similar to a direct quote; the textbook must be cited to avoid plagiarism.

 

 

 

Example 3***

Original version

ChartAccretion Chart for Illinois tax on OID bond,prepared by John Lindsay, Principal Financial Securities, Inc., 6/12/95.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plagiarized version:

ChartAs the following chart indicates, investment in an OID (Original Issue Discount) bond is taxable by the State of Illinois on the accretion and interest.

Why this is plagiarism:

The plagiarist has copied the entire chart and written about it with no citation. The reader is deceived into believing that the chart is original, created by the student. The
author must be cited to avoid plagiarism.

 

 

Acceptable version:

ChartAs the following chart indicates, investment in an OID (Original Issue Discount) bond is taxable by the State of Illinois on the accretion and interest.1

¹Accretion Chart for Illinois tax on OID bond, prepared by John Lindsay, Principal Financial Securities, Inc., 6/12/95.

COMMENT:

The student has used the chart to support her or his point and properly cited it. If the student had created an original chart, some of the facts used as its basis might need citations.

 

*   Plagiarism and How to Avoid it! Drew University
**  Academic Integrity at Princeton Princeton University
*** How to Avoid Plagiarism, Northwestern University

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